Volume 3, Issue 1, June 2018, Page: 33-37
Using Fish-Market-Fishes to Demonstrate the Methodological Approach to Establish Mathematical Relations Between Body Size and Body Weight
Maria Pagano, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry “Scuola Medica Salernitana”, University of Salerno, Baronissi (SA), Italy
Andrea Viggiano, Department of Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry “Scuola Medica Salernitana”, University of Salerno, Baronissi (SA), Italy
Received: Jul. 26, 2018;       Accepted: Aug. 7, 2018;       Published: Sep. 19, 2018
DOI: 10.11648/j.aap.20180301.15      View  358      Downloads  19
Abstract
Body mass index (BMI) is widely used to evaluate if a person has a normal body weight. This index may appear strange to a student because he could expect a cubic relation between body volume and any linear body dimension. The aim of the present experiment was to show the experimental approach to establish a mathematical relation between linear body dimensions and body weight by using a simple animal model. To this end, twelve sea bass and thirteen sea breams were obtained from a local fish-market. For each fish it was measured the body weight, the linear body dimensions, the body volume, the body surface area, and the visceral fat weight. The mathematical relations between all the experimental variables were evaluated pairwise, by plotting them on X-Y graphs and calculating the best fitting power-model. The results demonstrated that in fishes body weight fitted with any of the linear body dimensions raised to a power smaller than 2. The strongest of such correlations was between body weight and body length raised to a power of 1.5. Moreover, BMI did not correlate with visceral fat content. These results demonstrated that in fishes: 1) a non-linear correlation exists between body weight and linear body dimensions; 2) growth is allometric; 3) BMI is a fictitious index and does not describe a physiological phenomenon; 4) BMI is not predictive of visceral fat content; 5) other variables should be taken into account to obtain a more affordable mathematical model to describe the relation between body weight and linear body dimensions.
Keywords
Linear Body Dimensions, Body Surface Area, Body Weight, Visceral Fat, Body Mass Index
To cite this article
Maria Pagano, Andrea Viggiano, Using Fish-Market-Fishes to Demonstrate the Methodological Approach to Establish Mathematical Relations Between Body Size and Body Weight, Advances in Applied Physiology. Vol. 3, No. 1, 2018, pp. 33-37. doi: 10.11648/j.aap.20180301.15
Copyright
Copyright © 2018 Authors retain the copyright of this article.
This article is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/) which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.
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